Upcoming Seminar

Neil Reid

Friday, February 7

10:30 am - 11:30 am

1151 McCarty A

Attend Seminar via Zoom

Abstract:

There are over 8,000 craft breweries in the United States; as recently as 2011, there were less than 1,200. In 2018, Americans spent $114 billion on beer, of which $27 billion (24.1%) went towards purchasing craft beer. The popularity of craft beer is driven partly by consumers who enjoy the diversity of beer styles offered by craft producers, and partly by consumers who have a passion for supporting small-scale, independently owned, businesses. Like other industries, commercial craft brewing exhibits an uneven geography. In this presentation, I will do two things. First, I will explore the geography of craft brewing at the intra-urban scale. Factors influencing this geography include municipal zoning ordinances, the desire on the part of craft brewery entrepreneurs for inexpensive real estate, and opportunities to take advantage of agglomeration economies by clustering together in space. Second, I will explore the impact that craft breweries have on the neighborhoods in which they locate. As a business that sells alcohol, some fear that craft breweries could bring a number of negative externalities (e.g. anti-social behavior) to urban neighborhoods. I will argue, however, that craft breweries are a neighborhood amenity that enhance the quality of urban life. They do so by functioning as a walkable, neighborhood, Third Place; a flexible urban space where neighborhood residents come together to say, do yoga in the afternoon and enjoy a beer in the evening. As Third Places, craft breweries are also more inclusive than traditional bars, with many openly welcoming families (including children and dogs).

Bio:

The Beer Professor, aka Neil Reid, is Professor of Geography and Planning at The University of Toledo. He studies, writes, and lectures about the beer industry. He has presented lectures on the beer industry to international audiences in Austria, Australia, Canada, Denmark, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Sweden, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Neil grew up in the small village of Tarbet in the Scottish Highlands. After completing his undergraduate degree in geography at the University of Glasgow in 1987, he moved to the United States to pursue his graduate studies – first completing his MA in geography from Miami University in Oxford, OH and then his PhD in geography from Arizona State University in Tempe, AZ.

Kimberly Morgan Seminar

Yubing Fan

Tuesday, February 11

1:15 pm - 2:15 pm

1151 McCarty A

Attend Seminar via Zoom

Abstract:

This seminar will emphasize different topics and projects the candidate has worked on.

Bio:

Dr. Fan's research program is focused on agricultural production and natural resource economics. His dissertation examines households adoption of drought tolerant plants, farmers adoption of irrigation systems, and evaluation of application, and water use efficiency. His other research include cost-benefit analysis and economic risk analysis of farm conservation practices (conservation tillage, cover crops, and crop rotation) in both dryland and irrigated cropping systems, water economics and policy evaluation in the Midwest and High Plains, participatory water management and adoption of enhanced irrigation systems, and comparative evaluation of farm management practices.

Dr. Fan received his Ph.D from the University of Missouri and his MS from Lanzhou University, China. Dr. Fan is currently a Post Doctoral Associate at Texas A&M University AgriLife Research in Vernon Texas. His research areas focus on Production and Environmental Economics, Sustainable Water Management and Farm Irrigation, Adoption of Farm Best Management Practices, Adaptation to Climate Change, Natural Resources and Sustainability.

Kimberly Morgan Seminar

Kimberly Morgan

Thursday, February 13

2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

1151 McCarty A

Attend Seminar via Zoom

Abstract:

Uncertainty that matters – my preferred characterization of risk – informs the value of my application of economic principles to formulating solutions to wicked problems facing society. The US specialty crop industry refers to “fruits and vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, horticulture, and nursery crops (including floriculture)” as defined in statute by the Specialty Crops Competitiveness Act of 2004, as amended (P.L. 108-465, 7 U.S.C. 1621 note). According to the 2017 US Census of Agriculture, about 240,000 specialty crop producers generated $64.7 billion in sales, representing a 29% share of total US crop sales. Specialty crops in Florida accounted for $4.7 billion in sales, or two-thirds of the total value of the state’s total agricultural sales. In recognition of the relative importance of the specialty crop industry, selected provisions in the 2018 Farm Bill included mandatory funding of $100 million annually for the Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) through FY2023 and $85 million in annual funds for the Specialty Crop Block Grant (SCBG) program. From my perspective as a recipient of SCRI/SCBG funds and the economist on multidisciplinary project teams, I will share my findings and musings on transformative approaches required to evaluate risks facing economic agents who are invested in the specialty crop industry.

Bio:

Dr. Morgan joined the Agricultural and Applied Economics Department at Virginia Tech in July 2013 as an Extension Agricultural Economist and Junior Faculty Fellow for the Kohl Centre. She teaches undergraduate courses including Agricultural Financial Management, Economics of the Food and Fiber System, Food & Agribusiness Marketing, Foundations in Agribusiness and the Kohl Centre Experiential Learning Project Team course. Her extension program goal is to pursue multi-disciplinary, research-based, grant-funded research that serves to drive extension programs, such as Market Ready Training, Annie’s Project, the eXtension All About Blueberries Community of Practice, and the Market Maker portal. Kim’s research program goals are centered on measurable real-world needs and wants communicated by Virginia’s rural, natural resource, and agribusiness owners, managers and consumers. Specific research objectives include: understanding significant factors which influence specialty crop producers to adoption new technologies and/or pursue new marketing channels, determining the physical, behavioral and demographic characteristics of consumers motivated to seek out food and food products sold directly from the farm, and assessing the economic impacts of natural or man-made hazards on the private and public sectors of the state. Dr. Morgan earned a BS in 1993 in Animal Science, a M.S. in Food & Resource Economics in 1997, and a Ph.D. in Food & Resource Economics in 2007, all from the University of Florida. She worked with the University of Florida's Agricultural Market Research Center as an Economic Analyst from 2000-08. From July 2008-2013, Dr. Morgan was an Extension Agricultural Economist in the Agricultural Economics Department at Mississippi State University.