Skip to main content


Food and Resource Economics Department

Food and Resource Economics Department

Dr. Edward "Gilly" Evans

Professor and TREC Center Director

Dr. Edward 'Gilly' Evans is a professor in the Food and Resource Economics Department located at the University of Florida's Tropical Research and Education Center (TREC) in Homestead. He holds a Ph.D. in food and resource economics from the University of Florida with specialization in agricultural policy analysis, international trade, and development.

His previous research focused on theoretical and empirical analyses of international trade policy rules and institutions such as GATT, WTO, NAFTA, and LOME. His current research emphasizes applied agricultural trade policy analysis and environmental sustainability of agriculture. Most of his research is conducted as a member of interdisciplinary teams of scientists located at TREC and is aimed at generating economically viable and environmentally friendly technologies, practices, and production and marketing systems. Aspects of his work include generating knowledge to conserve and improve water quality at the watershed level, developing economically viable preventative integrated pest management vegetable production systems, implementing efficient fertilizer management, and exploring the economic feasibility of developing biodiesel from Jatropha and ethanol from sweet potatoes. He also investigates the economics of managing invasive species (foreign pests and diseases) in tropical and sub-tropical areas of the United States.

  • Research

    My research program explores the economic and environmental sustainability of agriculture and agricultural trade-related policy analysis.

    A major component of my research involves conducting analyses of the economic impacts of invasive species (foreign pests and diseases) on agricultural profitability and sustainability, and the likely costs and benefits associated with alternative management options. Other aspects of my research include working with colleagues to generate economically viable and environmentally friendly technologies, practices, and production and marketing systems, such as generating knowledge to conserve and improve the quality of water at the watershed level; finding suitable, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly alternatives to methyl bromide (soil fumigant) that are suited to Miami-Dade County's soil structure and topography; and conducting detailed market analysis of new and existing tropical horticultural commodities.

  • Extension

    The Agricultural Economics Extension program emphasizes applied trade policy analysis and related production and marketing issues.

    Specifically, the focus is to deliver education programs and publications that address current and emerging domestic and international trade-related policy issues impacting or having the potential to impact the production and marketing of a variety of vegetable, fruit, and ornamental horticultural products produced in Miami-Dade County. Impact analyses will also cover changes in regulations and the introduction of technologies and methods in pest control, nutrient management and other factors influencing production of commercial crops. As well, the program will publish commodity budgets for the production of popular crops in South Florida to provide commercial growers decision-making tools as to the financial investment required to grow new crops.


Images on this website were taken prior to national guidelines of face coverings and social distancing.

  • Education
    • Ph.D. Food and Resource Economics, University of Florida, 1999 
    • M.S. Agricultural Economics, University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies, 1982 
    • B.S.  Agriculture, University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago, West Indies, 1979
  • Publications